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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 130 (some duplicates have been removed)
SFGTV2
Nov 13, 2013 4:30am PST
early infrastructure design. los angeles county is a land of sprawling development. with development comes hundreds of square miles of concrete, leaving no way for water to naturally soak into the ground. in areas of such widespread urbanization, flooding can be devastating. man: back in early 1930s, there was a flooding that took a lot of lives and property. as a result, the city of los angeles, in order to protect future flooding in the city, they decided to take the los angeles river and make it a flood control channel. they concreted the walls of the river in order for water to get to ocean much faster. narrator: cities throughout southern california converted natural rivers to these concrete channels, part of their storm drain systems. this allowed expanding development without the need for large flood plains. kharaghani: the los angeles river is approximately 51 miles. concrete reduces the size of the river that you need to carry the water because it speeds up the flow of water. if you'd like to remove all the concrete and to have natural system to carry the water to protect yo
SFGTV2
Nov 25, 2013 5:30am PST
are various projects. los angeles storm drain system. they raised the dam. your water is a product of pw a. they built the sacramento water reservoir. the fans were so well built that in fact, they are still in use. the engineers said we have to replace a ball bearing. we of course, have neglected our infrainstruct our and it's rated to be a d and dropping. so if you don't pay your taxes, things do fall down. much of it is things that were built during the new deal. fortunately, they built them very well. so the stuff was really built to last. but, if you don't have taxes to run a state. i expect we will see more of that stuff. i will give you a brief tour that we take for granted. the commitment to public education in all its manifestations. public schools from kindergarten to higher education. there are thousand of new deal schools built within less than ten years. many have art work in or on them. this is berkeley high school. you shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free. the schools are always telling you that public education can make you better. it should be free.
SFGTV2
Nov 27, 2013 12:00pm PST
school, the job you worked. >> i was born in a town called and los angeles. it was a lot of working-class folks. my father was a shore worker, my mother was an office worker at usc. my parents were divorced when i was 10 years old, and i moved to the east coast for six years before going back to california after high school. i went to school at uc santa barbara, graduated in 19988 -- 1988. i have lived in the excelsior since 1999. i have had lots of different jobs, but my main job is doing social work force and a disco, i have been a community organizer, i worked at a labor organization supporting janitor's working in our high- rise buildings. i was a legislative aide before .wr. i got to see how it all work from the outside, community organizations supporting young people, children, families, working for labor, and saw how city hall could be an effective tool for change and then considered running in 2007, 2008, and somehow, i made it. >> you were raised in los angeles, moved to the east coast. what made you want to come back and live in san francisco? >> i love cities. i never fel
SFGTV2
Nov 27, 2013 4:00am PST
like los angeles, the scope of the task is staggering. the hyperion wastewater treatment plant serves four million people. it processes 350 million gallons of sewage and removes 500 tons of solids daily. after treatment at hyperion, what was once raw sewage is clean enough to release into santa monica bay. other cities and towns release treated wastewater, or effluent, into local rivers, lakes, and streams. as it flows downstream, additional cities may capture it for drinking water, consume it, and treat the water again. in other words, the water coming out of a wastewater treatment plant often enters the watershed, flows into intakes of drinking water treatment plants, and eventually finds its way right back to our faucets. it takes huge investments to ensure that wastewater and drinking water treatment plants function properly to maintain a safe water supply. we made the initial investments in the plants and the pipes. but once we accomplished that, there was this great recognition that we had a series of issues associated with wet weather conditions. storm events where, all of a su
SFGTV2
Nov 26, 2013 6:30pm PST
speaking he leaves los angeles and goes to brifrltd ton his mother had died and the bed-and-breakfast he took over and established a studio and had room for visitor and began portraying the fields of his summers. this was where he used to work when he was a young man 18-years old. it's the fields he's scattered his mothers ashes in. he maintenance a home in california but he's back to first things and back to a painting. over and over again he's trying to find ways for advantages. it's a series of watercolors and goes to the same place and one summer he does a series of water paintings. this is 6 o'clock no longer and this is 10 in the morning. he wanted to do bigger pictures and almost always when he has a body of work it's please a particular master at the constable made of english landscapes. which we couldn't have been making in english landscapes. if you think that about you is a canvas it will blow away but to do them in the landscape and he develops an idea of having multiple can have you seen and a working on sections of them and taking it back to the studio and come back and a s
SFGTV2
Nov 5, 2013 6:30am PST
of lives and property. as a result, the city of los angeles, in order to protect future flooding in the city, they decided to take the los angeles river and make it a flood control channel. they concreted the walls of the river in order for water to get to ocean much faster. narrator: cities throughout southern california converted natural rivers to these concrete channels, part of their storm drain systems. this allowed expanding development without the need for large flood plains. kharaghani: the los angeles river is approximately 51 miles. concrete reduces the size of the river that you need to carry the water because it speeds up the flow of water. if you'd like to remove all the concrete and to have natural system to carry the water to protect you from flooding, you need to have almost one mile on each side of the river set aside for transport of rain. so in order for the city to have use of those lands around the river, concrete made it possible to have minimum land so the water can be carried to the ocean in the fastest possible way. but, unfortunately, because of population
SFGTV2
Nov 24, 2013 11:30am PST
or years. maybe millions of years from now, part of los angeles will be in the bay area. >> for better or worse. >> yes. >> this is a tough question. >> those other ones weren't tough. >> this is a really easy challenge. are the smaller ones less stress? >> yes. the amount released in small earthquakes is that they are so small in you need many of those. >> i think would you probably have to have maybe hundreds of magnitude earthquakes of 4.7. >> so small earthquakes are not making our lives better in the future? >> not anyway that you can count on. >> i have heard that buildings in san francisco are on rollers and isolated? >> it's not true. it's a conventional foundation like almost all the circumstances buildings in san francisco. >> the trans-america was built way before. it's a pretty conventional foundation design. >> i have heard about this thing called the triangle of life and up you are supposed to go to the edge of your bed to save yourself. is there anything of value to that ? >> yes, if you are in your room. you should drop, cover and hold onto something. if you are
SFGTV2
Nov 19, 2013 12:00pm PST
loyola- marymount university in los angeles. i had a scholarship to play baseball. i remember coming down here to christie field, when my dad was in the military, seeing how the beaches have transformed into but we have today. you cannot beat the views, of course. it just holds summoning memories and i can come here with our kids, our family. i ended up going to ireland to get a master's degree at the university college of dublin. i went back to the states and went to law school at university of pennsylvania. then i came back, and choosing to live in san francisco was natural to me. when you are a child, you do not realize what you had until you leave home. i had the opportunity to live in los angeles, abroad in ireland, and there is no place like home, when you are from san francisco. i have been a corporate attorney at palo -- in palo alto. i became an >> i worked in the finance industry about 5 1/2 years. in the summer of 2009 i joined a venture capital firm with two other partners. >> we are all excited about the americas cup here in district two but one thing if you think about
SFGTV2
Nov 4, 2013 5:00am PST
right outside of the co-op. and then urban roads like this in the los angeles river and this is being built. this is mira loma park. this is lark merced blvd. it's all made of clay. it's going to slump. these are the roads built in
SFGTV2
Nov 12, 2013 3:00am PST
have nothing to do with this. i'm from los angeles county and let me tell you bail schedules are very high out there. but we work with the families, co-workers, and employers that want that person out of jail where they can continue to flourish in their society. the issue of -- well the pretrial is there is a misconception about which is fair and which isn't fair. i have to say for the sake of public safety, we offer a little bit of the bjs study that our statistics is true because we incorporate other people with a part of the skim in the game, if you will, the family and members and we do a better job of seeing people return to court. we don't judge, we just return them to court and make their appearances. >> there are a lot of organizations throughout the state that, you know, kind of pull their resources together to be able to engaged in some lobbying, i think it true for some associations and there is some lobbying for the california's association. do you know how much your organization spends on lobbying? >> we don't even have a paid lobbyist. but the sure ityty company the
SFGTV2
Nov 15, 2013 3:30am PST
involved in this. i have sat in los angeles and waiting for the sheriff department for a gentleman that had to get to his job or lose his job. and 36 hours later he's still in custody when he could have been bailed out through corporate bail. our industry brings to the state of california revenues in excess of 11 to $20 million to state revenues. and what i am hearing is that this movement is to chop us off completely. and i say no. we need to co-exist. there is a place for corporate charity bail and pretrial. but until the last year we really have not been invited to the table. and this kind of dialogue is very important. you need to hear what we have to say. and there is a misconception that gps monitoring, who is going to pay for that? the taxpayers or the defendant? generally i hear the models the defendant, does he want to go to work with a leg monitor on his leg or security bond. you are innocent until proven guilty. and the other thing about the pre-trial incarceration figures. they are not there because the family can't release the money. and it's hard to get the numbers, t
SFGTV2
Nov 19, 2013 1:30am PST
the main jail in los angeles where they process and you can almost feel bad for them but not quite. they process thousands of people. people with hispanic names are called out to be interviewed. he did not have the capacity to explain what i just told you was his background. he was on a bus. he went to immigration service. he was on a bus. he was taken to tijuana and released. no lawyer in that process. every religion that i'm familiar with teaches that things like that are not the right way to go and we do have public officials who are happy to mention their own religion and i get a kick out of it and check their voting record because on this issue and on your issue, they are part of the problem. who are they? they are your friends. they are the people you like. they like environmental things, other things. these things i tried to talk to them and so have others much more powerful than i am. he was in mexico for 3 months. he had a mental breakdown. he thought he was dead. to check if he was dead he stepped out in front of a trick and the truck missed him. and his mother went day i
SFGTV2
Nov 22, 2013 7:30am PST
today's master of ceremony, he is a legendary los angeles and oakland raiders wide receiver, 1987 heisman trophy winner from notredame and the national chairman for 911 welcome number 81, tim brown. [ applause ] >> thank you very much. elise. she left out number 81 in your program but number one in your heart she left that part out. so it is a pleasure to be here today. we are here to recognize two outstanding 911 youth heroes and four incredible 911 dispatch heroes. these youngsters acted with bravely and confidence, and in an imagine crisis situation and helped to save the lives of their loved ones. our 4, 911 dispatch heroes worked behind the scenes in cooperation with law enforcement and fire and emergency medical response, the men and women who answer this call each day are the true first responders when a emergency strikes which can often make the difference between life-and-death between people in need. they are truly real heroes. please join me in welcoming the director of san francisco management lisa hofmann. [ applause ] >> thank you, tim and thank you elise and kelley
SFGTV2
Nov 14, 2013 4:00am PST
north of los angeles and prosecute about 40,000 cases each year, so he is on the ground. he sees it all. he is however a green bay packer fan but we will forgive him because they lost. >> you should be very happy. you won. >> next to him is richard carranza and the superintendent of san francisco unified, just started in the summer of july. prior to that he was the deputy superintendent of innovation and social justice. [applause] next to richard is nancy o'malley, district attorney for alameda county. she was appointed in 2009 and elected in 2010 and has an amazing background dealing dealing with violence against women and domestic violence, elder abuse, child abuse and threat management. she's a wonderful addition to our panel so thank you nancy. [applause] next to nancy is tony smith who i loved his biobest of all and started he's an oakland resident and parent of students in oakland public schools. he was -- became the superintendent in 2009. he's a local boy including university of california berkeley background where he was captain of the football team and he did not include t
SFGTV2
Nov 7, 2013 10:00am PST
valley and everywhere and at los angeles. >> from the time when the permit is issued and the plans are drawn. >> how long will it take to build these? >> two years apiece. >> that is fairly basic. >> about 22 months for the smaller one and 24 months for the bigger one. >> any idea how long it took to get the permits? >> i have been working on this project since 2002. we submitted to planning in 2004 probably. we actually reconfigured the building once. it took us about three years to get the title and design and about one year to get the building permit. >> that sounds like a traditional san francisco building, and that is fairly quick. we think about the process you have to go through to approve the use of the space. is not just the technical issue, but just the use approval is complicated. in this case we probably did not have many appeals. in many cases we have neighborhood involvement where there are appeals and changes. only reconfiguring wants is doing a good job. >> the building was just begun yesterday, to the building over here of which is based on the same construction techni
SFGTV2
Nov 11, 2013 2:30pm PST
advocacy. we do this in the company across los angeles and all of san francisco. in support with david and staff at human rights commission, we have been able to launch the san francisco clinic to help people of color in san francisco. today we come together to remember the march on washington. we must remember this march was a call for action, a call for justice and equality and better future for all. the lawyers continue to reach that call to protect and promote civil rights. as we move forward today, we must remember the sacrifices made by those to create one for us and remember our duty to future generations to continue to fight for equity and civil rights for all. thank you. [ applause ] >> so, the youth commission did want to share with us that they have several resolutions that have been issued regarding summer jobs and urging the city to do more employment for youth and they have been doing a lot of work and wanting to make sure the youth center has the at some point to go outside and have recreation and have access to the yard and to also urging jpd to e equip the yard so ther
SFGTV2
Nov 20, 2013 2:00am PST
the law. there have been other counties in los angeles county and other counties who are considering it. >> why have they not adopted the law. what is it about forced treatment and the consequences for an allowing refusing treatment. we have a panel who have a knowledge of this subject in some cases because of their professional endeavors and in some cases because of personal experiences and in some cases, both. let me introduce them. karen chen is an attorney manager for the san francisco public defenders office, kathy, whose son battled mental illness, can is a subject treatment expert for the medical center. danny is the associate director for the serial neeb breet program for the city of san diego. and san francisco chief of police. gary is a psychiatrist and laura's law advocate and eduardo vega of the mental health association of san francisco. let me start by opposing a question to karen chen from the public defenders office. karen, can you -- how about if you start by giving us an overview of how the city handles this conflict between treatment and civil liberties. >> an invo
SFGTV2
Nov 14, 2013 2:00am PST
communications for the los angeles giants. >> if you think about what our mission is, you probably think our mission is to win the world series every year, which hopefully this year we're on the right track, but actually our mission statement, we just went through an exercise but our mission statement has always been to enrich the community through innovation. and it's very, i am very proud of the fact that the giants have been able to take that mission and bring it into the community through really dynamic partnership with the experts in the field. about 14 years ago, tommy short, my friend in the audience, came to us with sheriff hennesy and asked us to take on a controversial topic of violence and it was 14 years ago we hosted stamp out violence today. we brought together victims of violence, offenders, community leaders working on this issue to raise awareness about the impact of violence in our community. at that time the message was violence is learned and can be unlearned. the thing that the giants have and the reason why we're here today as part of this panel is we have this unique a
SFGTV2
Nov 4, 2013 6:00am PST
those in los angeles. and challenges facing small towns are very different from those in metropolitan areas. man: we have to have water supply for health purposes, for fire protection, and the economy. without it, things simply can't exist. woman: we have good health in this country, in part, because we have clean water. and we shouldn't forget that, and we shouldn't take it for granted. melosi: in the late 19th century, serious waterborne disease epidemics were having devastating effects. roy: but then, in the early 1900s, we began to treat our water. and since then, we've seen a rapid decline in the incidence of waterborne disease. narrator: most cities treat drinking water through filtration, chlorination, and sometimes ozonation to kill pathogens in the source supply. these are complex treatment plants that cost millions of dollars to operate, but are necessary for our wellbeing. the treatment of drinking water has been called one of the greatest public health achievements of the last century. the water infrastructure itself protects the treated water until it comes o
SFGTV2
Nov 14, 2013 2:00pm PST
commission los angeles county the separation of towers my ground level and bulk limitations. the revisions need to have the dwelling empower looked at. i'll be happy to discuss the variance in further daily but in conclusion the staff recommends this. the goals and objectives to concentrate dense urban context with the walking area. it's consistent with the overall transit center plan. we've received no communications or objections to this entitlement. that concludes my presentation and i'm available for questions >> thank you. project sponsor please. good evening good afternoon, commissioners i'm bob and i'm veil we're here on behalf of the reality. and we've got an architect here and our attorney >> i need to speak into this one. thank you in your packets there are things in your packets that i'll briefly review. sometimes it's good with the end in mind. this gives an image of 3 hundred and 50 feet and the nylon u underground parking shown and the red is our locations and the yellowish i am sorry are the new housing and the green is parkland and green is the new housing develop
SFGTV2
Nov 5, 2013 5:00am PST
electrical system. these are various projects. los angeles storm drain system. they raised the dam. your water is a product of pw a. they built the sacramento water reservoir. the fans were so well built that in fact, they are still in use. the engineers said we have to replace a ball bearing. we of course, have neglected our infrainstruct our and it's rated to be a d and dropping. so if you don't pay your taxes, things do fall down. much of it is things that were built during the new deal. fortunately, they built them very well. so the stuff was really built to last. but, if you n'
SFGTV2
Nov 4, 2013 5:30am PST
right outside of the co-op. and then urban roads like this in the los angeles river and this is being built. this is mira loma park. this is lark merced blvd. it's all made of clay. it's going to slump. these are the roads built in the oakland hills. nate, red woods. skyline. and enabled them to go up and develop the hills. the rural roads that go through the coast range. this enabled them to get their stuff to market. this is at road built by the ccc. this is a bridge. this is highway one and you won't know, except you look at the bridge and you will see dates, 1938, 1939. the airstrips are ccc. and the one out at treasure island. long beach, burbank. this is oakland and the whole built line railroad was redone. 19 is a pwa project and our great amphitheatres are from that time. this is santa barbara bowl. this is the forest theater in carmel and these are ccc workers putting huge bolder. here's 6 thousand people getting ready to enjoy oklahoma in that theater. big basin is a ccc project and this one, on the east river, new york. a project built where people from the lower east
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 130 (some duplicates have been removed)